BLOG UNDER CONSTRUCTION.

Image

chloe. is a’changin’. 

A new blog, reflecting the interests and projects of its writer will soon be live.

It will be regularly updated, rotating between three subjects: film, fashion and food. 

Film: shorts and indie, on-set footage from current projects.

Fashion: zero blogger-style shoots – strictly shows, new designers and interview-based.

Food: new restaurants in the capital, as well as a few lesser-known foodie hotspots.

See you on Monday!

x

Leave a comment

Filed under art

Isabella Blow: Fashion Galore!

Image

Fashion exhibitions at Somerset House are always an event – they, the V&A and Saatchi beat the Fashion and Textile Museum any day as far as I’m concerned.

Fashion Galore! is not only a fantastic exhibition of Blow’s extensive fashion collection, but also an intimate and poignant reflection of a life well lived.

See the full review on Aesthetica blog, and have a look at their current edition for the top film, fine art and photography on show during the festive season – including a few pages from yours truly, on Philippe Parreno’s incredible exhibition at the Palais de Tokyo, Paris. I’m desperate to visit it myself!

Back to Blow, and the most memorable elements of Fashion Galore! which for me were the two fashion films which form its finale: one of which documents the catalogue shoot, and La Dame Bleue, the 2008 McQueen collection dedicated to Isabella herself.

After a walk through Isabella’s personal life and career, viewing this collaboration between Alexander McQueen and Philip Treacy comes as quite the emotive surprise – emphasising the influence and lasting impression of one of the British fashion world’s most celebrated collectors, fashion editors and muses.

Visit Fashion Galore! at Somerset House before March 2nd, and have a peek at La Dame Bleue here…

Leave a comment

Filed under art

Aesthetica Short Film Festival

ASFF_high-resFour days. Seventeen venues. Thirty contributing countries. Three hundred films. Fifteen thousand visitors last year, and growing…

This year Aesthetica Short Film Festival is back again, and I’m going along for the ride!

From 7-10 Nov, the walled city of York will be a frenzy of activity with screenings, networking events, masterclasses, talks and seminars from the top names in international film.

Catering for the cinema-goer who wants a bespoke experience, screenings are housed in hidden locations across the city, ensuring that visitors use the festival programme like a treasure map – simultaneously moving between genres and architectural time periods, and discovering new additions at every corner.

I’ll be posting daily comments, images and films (see below) here, so stay tuned if you can’t make it to the festival yourself…!

Leave a comment

Filed under art, film

PROUD CAMDEN: Behind The Boosh

Image

© Dave Brown

Image

© Dave Brown

The Mighty Boosh is one of comedy’s ‘Marmites’: a bizarre fantasy, deemed either hilarious or bewildering. Dave Brown, better known as Bollo the Gorilla, has been the unofficial photographer of the Boosh from day one, often photographing the unusual exploits of Howard Moon and Vince Noir whilst still in costume – half-man, half-ape.

Proud Camden, venue extraordinaire, is the ideal setting for Behind the Boosh: surreal behind-the-scenes snapshots which are so full of energy, haphazard assortments of strange costumes and props, that they even appear staged.

Image

© Dave Brown

Image

© Dave Brown

Image

© Dave Brown

A combination of light-hearted, whimsical moments; and darker shots of the actors’ down-time, this exhibition reminds of the exhaustion which comes with a life lived on stage – and the value of humour in remedying it.

Behind the Boosh brings fans even closer to characters that dominated late-night television for five years, and reveals the intelligent creative processes behind a hallucinogenic world dominated by boxing kangaroos, drug-addicted foxes, an advice-giving moon and a polo-eyed cockney psychopath.

Behind the Boosh is now on show at Proud Camden until 1st Dec 2013.

Image

© Dave Brown

Image

© Dave Brown

Image

© Dave Brown

1 Comment

Filed under art

POP ART DESIGN, Barbican

 

4de8f55e-fbb1-4281-96a9-ae7333f31f5563d40fd1-ad8c-4a7e-bc30-c8b682d52738

With the Barbican hosting its finale, this comprehensive review of the relationship between Pop Art and design from Vitra Design Museum has just gone up a notch: its European tour finishing on a high with the addition of works from leading British institutions such as the V&A, Tate and many private collectors. These two hundred works are housed within a curvaceous set designed by AOC Architecture, immediately transporting visitors into the bold, brash and mischievously seductive world of Pop Art.

rosenquist 1

Pop Art may often be disregarded as overindulgent, however this exhibition reveals its deeply historical nature – presenting its related art and design movements as symptoms of a much wider social transformation, and quickly dispelling any suggestion of triviality.  Artworks, furniture, sculpture, the printed media and even images of collectors’ homes expose the sheer impact of the movement upon 1950s-70s life, with even banal activities like tupperware parties notes as significant steps towards the acceptance of curvaceous plastic forms within the home.

The domestic sphere is key to the exhibition, and offering an utterly bizarre take on this is a gallery of photographs depicting the penthouse apartment of playboy Gunter Sachs. These futuristic images (think Austin Powers meets James Bond) are wildly surreal and uplifting, whilst also reminding of the essential functionality of the show’s design works – a much needed affirmation when the line between art and design becomes so blurred.

An extensive, informative and visually stimulating assortment of infamous, iconic and lesser known works, Pop Art Design could, one day, be remembered as a highly influential turning point for contemporary art and design movements alike.

Full review will be live on Aesthetica Blog in the next few days….

Jt09LsNSvmw5SdCMZh49fdvbEgb1T21ATI9GiJyzQvs

Pop Art Design

Barbican Centre

22 Oct ’13 – 9 Feb ’14

 

Leave a comment

Filed under art

Tate Modern: Paul Klee, Making Visible

Image

“Art does not reproduce the visible; rather it makes visible.” – Paul Klee

Tutor at the Bauhaus, contemporary of Kandinsky and one of the most inventive artists of the twentieth century, Klee is best known for his colour-blocking and innovative gradation technique. However, this exhibition reveals another dimension to Klee’s work and poses him more as an illustrator – his oil-transfer technique as a new approach to printmaking, through which he created whimsical scenes and bizarre characters – explained as his way of dealing with the horrors of war.

Klee’s work combines the representational and the abstract; vivid tones and dark motifs; geometric shapes and soft spatterings of colour. When isolated, Klee’s work can appear simplistic and its themes trivial, however when placed chronologically as in Making Visible, shapes become torrents of gunfire and the smiles of half-formed characters are  ironic and foreboding.

Image

Klee’s haphazard tableaus reveal themselves as a coping mechanism for his turbulent life – the untimely splitting of the Blaue Reiter group, the inclusion of his works within the Nazi ‘Degenerate Art’ exhibition - real events placed within theatrical settings to allow for a much needed psychological separation.

Klee is known for colour and life, yet in this context his colours are tainted – immediately dirtier, darker – only dramatically lifting when the artist ventured to Italy or Tunisia, as if his palette needed reminding.

Making Visible reveals the radically inventive yet troubled individual behind a vast collection of otherwise seemingly childlike works; not only providing an insight into the life of Paul Klee, but also standing as a fascinating reminder of the catastrophic effects of the Second World War upon artists, art institutions and art practice of the time.

Image

Leave a comment

Filed under art

FRIEZE 2013

Gagosian, London

Gagosian, London

Last year’s fair took a turn towards true artistry; with a heavier emphasis on painting and drawing , it seemed that a new wave of contemporary draughtsmen might, for a few years, transform Frieze into something more than the vulgar cattle market it has become. Unfortunately, this was not to be. In fact Frieze 2013 displayed more bronze faux-plastic, metallic-painted fibreglass and banal naive works than ever before.

Architects Carmody Groarke designed this year’s fair, and with fewer galleries and wider walkways than previously, the fair was certainly easier and breezier than ever before. Still, Frieze often consists of more fluff than fine art, and so with this drop in galleries came a drop in memorable works.

Memorable moments, however, were aplenty – a French toddler running, arms outstretched and screeching at Jeff Koon’s Toys R Us-inspired sculpture park; a slick haired yuppie reducing Ron Mueck’s melancholy mother and baby sculpture to simply “SO London”; a young gent remarking, to one performer of James Lee Byars’ Four In a Dress, that now he could “now tell people that I know this artwork well, that I’ve really spent time with it.”

Untitled

Untitled

Having endured the art-speak of Frieze Art Fair, I suspect that Frieze Masters was a markedly different story. I had vowed that this year I would only bother with Masters, but somehow I found myself at the main fair without a press pass to its younger (yet far more dignified) partner. First there was Frieze, then there was Frieze plus mini-fair Frieze Masters, and now both are of almost the same size – has Frieze Art Fair been relegated? Has Octobertime Regents Park  now been taken over by two different pop-up shops: one for brash fibreglass pieces and one for paintings? And, whilst we’re at it, how exactly did a gallery whose chief piece of work was a folded up electric blanket win the £10 000 Stand Prize?

Untitled

Meaningless Stand Prizes aside, Hauser and Wirth stood out as one of the few galleries which curated an exhibition, rather than a shop window: the analogue blur of a softly buzzing video installation from Diana Thater was echoed by a wall-sized blue/gray misted canvas from Sterling Ruby, which in turn acted as a soft-focus background to an intricately detailed Paul McCarthy woodcarving and a craggy Thomas Houseago – meanwhile all of these works were subject to the dejected stare of Ron Mueck’s “SO London” Woman with Shopping.

The “if you don’t like this one, try it in blue, or bronze, or BIG” approach of many contributors is inevitable – they are of course here to sell – and what often appeases this bland presentation is exciting, surprising works. It was in this element of surprise that Frieze 2013 truly lacked: the show was almost a ‘top picks’ of recent exhibitions – works seen at Saatchi, the V&A, White Cube, on the Fourth Plinth re-presented by different galleries, resized and repackaged (or even gaudily re-sprayed gold in the case of Elmgreen and Dragset).

Victoria Miro, London

Frieze is always exhausting, painful and often slightly disappointing, yet it is the anticipation of being surprised and even blown away by artistic innovation, that reels us all back in every year. We congregate in a white big top and cover miles of hilly carpeted corridors in inappropriate shoes, sustained by the London Fashion Week diet of sushi and overpriced glasses of champagne; some buy, some indulge in listening to the buyers; we people-watch as much as we examine the art, and the art which we examine is less art than sustenance for desperately hungry egos to feed off for one more year, until it’s October all over again and we find ourselves back in Regent’s Park, nauseatingly addicted.

Oh the hell with it – long live Frieze!

Untitled

Leave a comment

Filed under art